Sandra Lane at BEARSPACE

SANDRA LANE

05.09 – 27.09.2014

Sandra Lane’s exhibition at BEARSPACE in Deptford marks the first solo exhibition of Sandra Lane, the 2013/2014 Camberwell Studio Award recipient. Lane’s practice encompasses elements of sculpture, drawing and painting. This exhibition will present a series of sculptural forms alongside corresponding iPad drawings. Investigating microscopic botanical and biological forms normally viewed through a lens, Lane expands these forms to become crumbling, powdery, wobbling objects lumbered with gravity like larger, more familiar, terrestrials. These structures seem to harbour the same watercolour tints and balletic aspirations of the microscopic forms, yet at the same time remain too impractical to withstand the transition to our gravity. This exhibition will also explore Lane’s preoccupation with the notion of futile feet, like the pseudopodia (false feet) that the shape-shifting amoeba puts out to make a foolish leg from its jelly body, or the pointless foot of the snail that takes it nowhere fast. Lane, again, solidifies these forms so they become anthropomorphic in their scale and shape, yet they seem to teeter on the edge of collapse to become at once optimistic, absurd and sad. The Camberwell Studio Award, a joint initiative between Camberwell College of Arts and Acme Studios aimed at supporting recent graduates at a critical point in their career.  The Award includes a shared rent-free studio for 12 months, 100 access hours to college facilities, professional development and a bursary of £2,500 funded by Acme. Sandra Lane is the third recipient of the award.

An Alberta sculptor fights oil companies to exhibit art on his own land

By Amy Fung

As you walk through Peter von Tiesenhausen’s land, artwork emerges as if summoned from the ground up. Ships and nests made of willow branches appear along well-worn paths. Statues carved from logs stand watch from between the trees. In Tiesenhausen’s studio, small canvases that resemble the cracked earth of recent droughts are propped across the window sill and sketches of aspen trees (drawn with aspen ash onto aspen pulp paper) hang along the wall.

Philosophically and aesthetically, it’s clear that the landscape and the art are inseparable, and since 1997, the Alberta visual artist has pursued this argument legally as well, taking the unprecedented step of copyrighting his land as a work of art.

Tiesenhausen made the decision after years of legal battles with oil and gas companies that wanted access to the deposits of natural gas that sit just beneath his 800-acre plot of land. Under federal law, Alberta landowners have the rights only to the surface of their land. The riches that lie beneath are generally owned by the government, which can grant oil and gas producers access so long as the companies agree to compensate landowners. This compensation is usually for lost harvests and inconvenience, but, Tiesenhausen reasoned, what if instead of a field of crops these companies were destroying the life’s work of an acclaimed visual artist? Wouldn’t the compensation have to be exponentially higher?

“I’m not trying to get money for my land, I’m just trying to relate to these companies on their level,” says Tiesenhausen from his home near Demmitt, Alberta. “Once I started charging $500 an hour for oil companies to come talk to me, the meetings got shorter and few and far between.”

Continue reading:

http://this.org/magazine/2010/04/22/peter-von-tiesenhausen-fights-oil-companies/

http://www.tiesenhausen.net/

An Alberta sculptor fights oil companies to exhibit art on his own land

By Amy Fung

As you walk through Peter von Tiesenhausen’s land, artwork emerges as if summoned from the ground up. Ships and nests made of willow branches appear along well-worn paths. Statues carved from logs stand watch from between the trees. In Tiesenhausen’s studio, small canvases that resemble the cracked earth of recent droughts are propped across the window sill and sketches of aspen trees (drawn with aspen ash onto aspen pulp paper) hang along the wall.

Philosophically and aesthetically, it’s clear that the landscape and the art are inseparable, and since 1997, the Alberta visual artist has pursued this argument legally as well, taking the unprecedented step of copyrighting his land as a work of art.

Tiesenhausen made the decision after years of legal battles with oil and gas companies that wanted access to the deposits of natural gas that sit just beneath his 800-acre plot of land. Under federal law, Alberta landowners have the rights only to the surface of their land. The riches that lie beneath are generally owned by the government, which can grant oil and gas producers access so long as the companies agree to compensate landowners. This compensation is usually for lost harvests and inconvenience, but, Tiesenhausen reasoned, what if instead of a field of crops these companies were destroying the life’s work of an acclaimed visual artist? Wouldn’t the compensation have to be exponentially higher?

“I’m not trying to get money for my land, I’m just trying to relate to these companies on their level,” says Tiesenhausen from his home near Demmitt, Alberta. “Once I started charging $500 an hour for oil companies to come talk to me, the meetings got shorter and few and far between.”

Continue reading:

http://this.org/magazine/2010/04/22/peter-von-tiesenhausen-fights-oil-companies/

http://www.tiesenhausen.net/

annajungdesign

annajungdesign:

 

Cameron Stalheim Sculptures

these are disturbing. In a good way. We came across the sculpture works of Cameron Stalheim this morning, and they are quite intense and grotesque. Cameron says of his work, ” I am interested in fantasy, reality and the objectification that happens in between.” Most of these pieces are made from plastics, foams, steel, and acryli

purnsz

purnsz:

Artwork for Mayr-Melnhof Packaging byGerlinde Gruber

on Behance

untitled, 2014
 Cardboard on Wood
800 x 400 cm

My goal is to create specialised packaging designs highly inspired by their contents.

I love solving given challenges by making the packaging part of the product experience and delivering the clients’ message in a unique way. Products will be recognisable and reliably dressed without unnecessary design to preserve product authenticity. My packaging designs are characterized by cleverness and a surprising simplicity.

Furthermore I can support you in redesigning and optimizing your existing solutions. Even small changes in die-cut and choice of materials can increase efficiency and sustainability of your packagings.